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.: Home > Canadian Military Journal > 2012 > Volume 12 Number 1 > Captain Tyler Wentzell, an infantry officer, recently completed his MA in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). In 2008, he deployed to Afghanistan as a company mentor for the Afghan National Army (ANA). There, he served as a trainer, mentored the ANA on independent operations, and facilitated partnered operations with Canadian, American, Portuguese, and British forces. From 2009 to 2011, he was second in command of the Security Force Capacity Building Centre of Excellence at the Canadian Manoeuvre Training Centre. He is currently studying law at the University of Toronto, and serving with the 48th Highlanders of Canada.

Security Force Capacity Building: Local Ownership versus Human Capital

Captain Tyler Wentzell, an infantry officer, recently completed his MA in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). In 2008, he deployed to Afghanistan as a company mentor for the Afghan National Army (ANA). There, he served as a trainer, mentored the ANA on independent operations, and facilitated partnered operations with Canadian, American, Portuguese, and British forces. From 2009 to 2011, he was second in command of the Security Force Capacity Building Centre of Excellence at the Canadian Manoeuvre Training Centre. He is currently studying law at the University of Toronto, and serving with the 48th Highlanders of Canada.
Captain Tyler Wentzell, an infantry officer, recently completed his MA in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). In 2008, he deployed to Afghanistan as a company mentor for the Afghan National Army (ANA). There, he served as a trainer, mentored the ANA on independent operations, and facilitated partnered operations with Canadian, American, Portuguese, and British forces. From 2009 to 2011, he was second in command of the Security Force Capacity Building Centre of Excellence at the Canadian Manoeuvre Training Centre. He is currently studying law at the University of Toronto, and serving with the 48th Highlanders of Canada.
Abstract :

Canadian Operational Mentor and Liaison Teams (OMLTs) working with the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) have recently brought attention to a key element of counterinsurgency operations: the development of host nation security forces. This process, known as Security Force Capacity Building (SFCB) in Canada, and Security Force Assistance (SFA) in the United States, is the predominantly military contribution to the wider Security Sector Reform (SSR) process. The Canadian Forces’ (CF) counterinsurgency doctrine emphasizes the utility of developing and working with host nation security forces due to their local knowledge, the perception of legitimacy they bring to the campaign, and, ultimately, their key role in providing lasting local solutions, thus allowing our own forces to withdraw.1 Their involvement is not, however, a cure-all. Inept, corrupt, or cruel indigenous security forces can be as much of a hindrance in counterinsurgency as effective forces can help. These forces will require varying degrees of guidance and direction. Afghanistan has proven to be an extreme example of this. Given the nation having endured decades of conflict, the human capital required for a professional police and army had been almost completely eliminated. More than the reform of the security sector, the Afghan campaign has required the nearly-total creation of a security apparatus. In the absence of the required human capital, intervening nations are forced to fill the void. This requirement, however, is at odds with another key element of SSR: the requirement for local ownership. This article proposes that the interplay between human capital and local ownership dictate the organizational model best suited to the development of these security forces, as illustrated at Figure 1.1. Although sublime elements such as local culture and traditions ensure that no two situations will be alike, these two key factors – human capital and local ownership – offer a useful tool in the selection of the models available in the development of the host nation security forces in humanitarian operations, peacekeeping, counterinsurgency, and high intensity operations alike.

Keywords :
Security Force Capacity Building: Local Ownership versus Human Capital

Date Deposited : 08 Apr 2015 10:02

Last Modified : 08 Apr 2015 10:30

Official URL: http://www.journal.forces.gc.ca/arc/index-eng.asp

Volume 12, Number 1, - 2012

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