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.: Home > Animal Science Papers and Reports > 2015 > Volume 33 Number 2 > Sławomir Sadkowski1 , Marta Molińska-Glura2 , Krzysztof Moliński3 , Dawid Szczepankiewicz4 , Marek Świtoński1 , Maciej Szydłowski1 *

A well-known mutation in RYR1 alters distribution of adipose tissue in gilts

Sławomir Sadkowski1 , Marta Molińska-Glura2 , Krzysztof Moliński3 , Dawid Szczepankiewicz4 , Marek Świtoński1 , Maciej Szydłowski1 *
Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wołyńska 33, 60-637 Poznań, Poland 2 Department of Computer Science and Statistics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Dąbrowskiego 79, 60-529 Poznań, Poland 3 Department of Mathematical and Statistical Methods, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 28, 60-637 Poznań, Poland 4 Department of Animal Physiology and Biochemistry, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wołyńska 35, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Abstract :

The swine RYR1 (ryanodine receptor 1) gene is a major gene for meatiness, but its effect on the fatness and location of fat deposition is less known. A known mutation in this gene is responsible for a drastic deterioration of meat quality. We provide evidence that the mutation (c.1843T) alters fat distribution between back fat and abdominal fat, which are of different value in meat processing. The study included 486 gilts representing the Polish Landrace, PL (n=242) and synthetic line L990 (n=244). All gilts were classified into 3 clusters according to their predisposition to fat distribution between visceral and subcutaneous tissues. We found a relationship between this classification and RYR1. The mutation c.1843C>T changed the distribution of body fat between these tissues in PL and L990 (P=0.0384), and in L990 separately (P=0.0277). No evidence for such an effect was observed when PL was analyzed separately. Compared to the CC homozygotes the T allele was associated with a lower abdominal fat deposition and heterozygous gilts tended to allocate adipose tissue in back fat; however, the effect on fat distribution was independent of general fatness of a pig.

Keywords :
fat distribution / obesity / pig / SNP / RYR1

Date Deposited : 06 Jan 2016 09:21

Last Modified : 06 Jan 2016 09:21

Official URL: http://www.ighz.edu.pl/?p0=5&p1=34&o=7556

Volume 33, Number 2, March 2015 , ISSN 109-117

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